WHO AMR Resources                
  • Over 70% of human's exposure to antibiotics comes from healthy animals that have given antibiotics to address unsanitary conditions, stress and crowding situations.

  • A major reason why antibiotics are given to certain animals, especially poultry, is because of their growth promoting effects, not necessarily to prevent infection.

  • Avoid meat and other products that have antibiotics, and/or other substances within them that increase the risk of AMR. [1.2] [1.3]

DON'T
SHARE ANTIBIOTICS

The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) as a global health issue.  According to the WHO AMR is defined as “Antimicrobial resistance happens when microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites) change when they are exposed to antimicrobial drugs (such as antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, antimalarials, and anthelmintics). Microorganisms that develop antimicrobial resistance are sometimes referred to as “superbugs”. [1.1]

  • The overuse and misuse of antibiotics not only contributes to AMR, but it can be dangerous to your health.  Antibiotics can be an effective treatment against specific bacteria, but if they are used inappropriately can increase your risk to more severe infections. It is also important not to share antibiotics as there are many different types of antibiotics and it is important for a medically trained practitioner to determine which one is appropriately for you. [1.4]

  • When the use of antibiotics is indicated finish the entire course as prescribed by your doctor. Do not stop taking the antibiotics the moment you feel better. This could lead to growth of more resistant strains of bacteria.

  • Prevention of serious infections is the ultimate goal [1.8]

  • Practice proper hygiene

  • Strengthen overall digestive and immune health

  • Address dietary and lifestyle factors

  • Support your natural healing ability

  • Explore natural treatment options to AMR [1.5] [1.6] [1.7]

  • Support your immune system, especially during times of higher risk of exposure to infectious disease, including during certain seasons (eg. winter), when travelling (eg. in airplanes) or during times of high stress (eg. during school exams, demanding times at work).

The following outlines the naturopathic approach to AMR and the research supporting a naturopathic prevention, assessment and treatment approach.

SUPPORT YOUR
IMMUNE SYSTEM
IDENTIFY THE
UNDERLYING CAUSE
EXPLORE NATURAL
TREATMENT OPTIONS
AVOID MEAT
WITH ANTIBIOTICS
DON'T USE ANTIBIOTICS
FOR VIRAL INFECTIONS
  • Infections can be caused by bacteria, viral, fungal or parasitic factors. Also some inflammatory and environmental factors can have symptoms that mimic infections. To help reduce the risk of AMR, only use antibiotics when they are absolutely necessary and include natural treatment options as an important part of the treatment plan.

  • Only use antibiotics, and other antimicrobial medications, when there is clear indication to do so, mostly based on laboratory diagnosis but also sometimes based on very specific signs and symptoms.

Anti-Microbial Resistance (AMR) Committee Members

Dr. Iva Lloyd, ND WNF President (Canada)

Dr. Adele Pelteret (South Africa)

Erika Brajnik (Slovenia)

Dr. Jillian Stansbury (USA)

Dr. Kimberley Ramberan, ND (Atrium Innovations)

Luisa Nuernberg Losso, Nat., MPH (Brazil) 

Dr. Paul Saunders, ND (Canada)

Poorna Menon (Bastyr student-volunteer)

Dr. Rahim Moledina, ND (Canada)

Sarah Brenchley, Naturopath (New Zealand)

Tina Hausser, Heilpraktiker (Spain)

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